from GrowAGoodLife.com

 

Fresh herbs are a delicious way to add flavor to any meal, and growing the herbs yourself make them every more tasty!

Here are 5 herbs that grow great during the winter.

 

Chives

If you grow only one herb indoors over winter, let it be chives. The mild onion flavor compliments many dishes of numerous cuisines from breakfast to dinner.

Sun: 4-6 hours

Temperature: Average room temperature. Will withstand temperatures fluctuation of 55-75 degrees Fahrenheit (13-24 degrees Celsius)

Soil: All-purpose potting mix.

Water: Twice a week when soil surface feels dry. Tips of foliage will turn dry.

Harvest: Once the plan is 6 inches (15 cm) tall, cut leaves as needed leaving at lease 2 inches (5 cm) of growth above the soil. The plant will continue to grow.

 

Oregano

Oregano is a staple in many households and is used frequently in Italian dishes as a pizza topping.

Sun: 6-8 hours

Temperature: Average room temperature. Will withstand temperature fluctuation of 55-75 degrees Fahrenheit (13-24 degrees Celsius)

Soil: Well-drained, sandy soil. Mix equal parts all-purpose potting mix and sharp sand. Or use cactus-potting mix.

Water: Water when soil surface feels dry about once a week. Oregano is susceptible to root rot so do no over water.

Harvest: Once the plant is 6 inches (15 cm) tall, cut stems as needed leaving at least two sets of leaves. Frequent trimmings produce a bushy, compact plant with healthier foliage making Oregano one of the easiest herbs to grow in-doors over winter.

 

Rosemary

You can grow rosemary in the same pot for a few years.

Sun: At lease 6 hours.

Temperature: Average room temperature. Will withstand tempura fluctuation of 45-70 degrees Fahrenheit (7-21 degrees Celsius) in winter.

Soil: Well-drained, sandy soil. Mix equal parts all-purpose potting mix and sharp sand. Or use cactus-potting mix.

Water: Allow a few inches or soil to dry out between waterings then water thoroughly. Rosemary likes to stay on the dry side.

Harvest: Once the plant is 6 inches (15 cm) tall, cut stems as needed. New growth will continue forming on the stem. Rosemary grows slowly, so don’t harvest more than 1/3 of the plant at one time.

 

Thyme

The intense flavvor of Thyme complements most meals, including chicken, beef, pork, and game. Use thyme in winter in crockpot stews and roasts.

Sun: At least 6 hours.

Temperature: Average room temperature around 50-70 degrees Fahrenheit (10-24 degrees Celsius)

Soil: Well-drained, sandy soil mix. Mix equal parts all-purpose potting mix and sharp sand. Or use cactus-potting mix.

Water: Allow top 1-inch (2.54 cm) of soil to dry out between waterings then water thoroughly. Once established, Thyme is drought resistant.

Harvest: Once the plant is established, cut foliage as needed leaving 3-inch (7.5 cm) stems to continue growing.

 

Parsley

More than just a garnish, parsley adds a light, fresh flavor and busts of color to many dishes including roasts, grilled steaks, chicken, fish, and vegetables.

Sun: At least 6 hours.

Temperature: Average room temperature. Will withstand temperature fluctuation of 55-755 degrees Fahrenheit (13-24 degrees Celsius)

Soil: All-purpose potting mix.

Water: Twice a week when soil surface feels dry.

Harvest: Once the plant is established, cut stems at the bast leaving at least 2-inch (5 cm) stems to continue growing.

 

Helpful Tips:

  • If you start your indoor herb garden in the fall, begin with established plants so they will continue to grow indoors over winter and produce quicker. Growing from seeds requires more attention and time before the herbs can be harvested and used.
  • If you have houseplants, it is a good idea to quarantine any plants brought in from your garden for a while to be sure there are no hitchhikers such as pests or diseases. Leave these in a separate room for several weeks to be sure there are no surprises.
  • Propagating herbs from cuttings is a quick way to establish a plant. Cut a 5-inch stem, strip off the bottom few inches of leaves, place stem in water to root, plant into post once roots develop, and water frequently until established. Then water as needed.
  • Fertilizer can be used to give the herbs a boost to help them grow indoors. Feed your herbs with liquid seaweed or to dress with compost in late winter as daylight begins to increase.
  • If you don’t have a sunny south facing window, use a grow light or fluorescent light to supplement lighting.